Prisoner Hunger Strike at Menard Correctional Center in Illinois.

We speak with Attorney Staughton Lynd about the latest developments in the prisoner hunger strike at Menard Correctional Center in Illinois, which began on January 15th.

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Bonnie Kerness of the Prison Watch Project on the History of Solitary Confinement and the Dallas 6 Case.

Longtime prison activist Bonnie Kerness of the American Friends Service Committee’s Prison Watch Project explains some aspects of the political history of solitary confinement in the United States from its uses on Native American nations in the early history of this country and radical activists in the 1960s and 70s to its uses today on prisoner-activists like members of the Dallas 6.

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On Hacktivist and Former Anonymous Member, Jeremy Hammond: An Interview with Bria Grace About the Case.

On November 15, former Anonymous member Jeremy Hammond was sentenced to 10 years in prison without the possibility of parole for having violated one count of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.

We speak with his friend and member of the Jeremy Hammond Defense Committee, Bria Grace, about the case and her friendship with Hammond.

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An Interview with Andre Jacobs of the Dallas 6 About the Group’s Prison Protest Against Solitary Confinement.

Andre Jacobs, one of the Dallas 6 facing riot charges in a Luzerne County Courthouse on December 9th for placing bedding over their cell door windows, speaks to us. The act, Jacobs explains, was an attempt to call the attention of high-ranking prison officials to the abusive treatment of prison guards towards the 6 inmates. They were instead extracted from their cells, during the course of which some inmates were tasered and/or beaten, Andre claims, and then slapped with riot charges.

Part 1.

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Part 2.

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The Dallas 6: The Case of a Group of Men Protesting the Conditions of Their Solitary Confinement in a Pennsylvania Prison.

In April of 2010, a group of inmates at SCI Dallas prison in Pennsylvania placed bedding over their cell door windows in order to draw the attention of high-ranking administrative personnel to the abuse they were suffering at the hands of prison guards in the solitary confinement unit where they were being housed. Instead of receiving the help they sought, they were slapped with riot charges.

On December 9, 2013, they will be fighting those charges in court and in the process present testimony describing details of their and others’ brutal treatment while in Dallas’s solitary confinement. Such maltreatment ranges from food tampering and meal with-holding, to beatings, use of a torture chair, and death.

The group of men are known as the Dallas 6.

Below is an interview with Shandre Delaney, mother of one of the Dallas 6–Carrington Keys–about the details of the case conducted for WJWN Radio and The Other America Files.

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Below is an interview with Shandre Delaney and Dallas 6 member Derrick Stanely conducted by Brother Ramisous and Vania Gulston for the Legacy of a Nation Radio Show.

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Dr. Johanna Fernandez of Educators for Mumia Abu Jamal Speaks on the Latest Developments in the Mumia Abu Jamal Case.

On Wednesday, December 7th, Philadelphia’s District Attorney’s Office announced that it will not pursue the death penalty in the case of Mumia Abu Jamal.  Earlier this year, the Third Circuit Cour of Appeals ruled that because of unclear instructions delivered to the jury in Mumia Abu Jamals sentencing trial years ago, Mumia Abu Jamal should be allowed a new sentencing-phase trial or be sentenced to life-behind bars without the possibility of parole.

In the wake this partial victory for Mumia Abu Jamal and his supporters, Dr. Johanna Fernandez, assistant professor of history at Baruch College of the City University of New York and member of Educators for Mumia Abu Jamal, speaks to “On The Block Radio” about the significance of the decision and what’s next for Mumia supporters.

[Audio of interview is forthcoming. Please check back.]

Another Perspective on Libya: Libyan-American Educator Lutsi Taleb Reflects on Libya Under Qadhafi’s Leadership.

“On the Block Radio” talks to Lutsi Taleb, a United States educator about recent events in Libya, Libya in the early years of Qadhafi’s rule, and his reaction to Cythia McKinney’s speaking tour on Libya.

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The Prisoner Hunger Strike Resumes in California Prisons.

On September 26, 2012, prisoners in California resumed a hunger strike that had been suspended at the end of July after receiving statements by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation that prison officials will meet some of the prisoners’ demands.

The hunger strike was initiated in the middle of this past summer in protest of what prisoners have described as the cruel and unusual conditions endured by inmates in the state’s prisons.  According to Laura Magnani, a member of the team mediating on behalf of prisoners with CDCR officials last summer, while some positive movement by CDCR officials has been made in the last few months in meeting the initial demands of inmates, “it is painfully slow for people who have lived under conditions of torture for years, and often decades in California’s prison system.  While the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation tries to paint the prisoners as nothing more than ‘dangerous gang members,’ we see this strike as a courageous effort to work across all cultural and ethnic divisions through time-honored non-violent actions.”

Isaac Ontiveros of the Prisoners Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition, reports that based on accounts from family members and unconfirmed sources for the Coalition, the strike resumed on last Monday with 6000 prisoners taking part.

“On the Block” speaks with Isaac Ontiveros about the recent developments.

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Cynthia Mckinney Speaks on Libya in Philadelphia, PA.

On Friday, September 26, 2012, Cynthia McKinney spoke at to an audience at Philadelphia’s Calvary United Methodist Church about a trip she took to Libya earlier this year.  Above is a recording of her presentation.

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A Roundtable Discussion on Flash Mobs, Youth Uprisings, and Mayor Nutter’s "Sermon."

On the heels of Mayor Nutter’s address at a West Philadelphia church in which he spoke out against recent waves of youth striking out violently at folks walking down the street and gang robbing stores, a diverse group of Philadelphia residents sat down to share their perspectives on what has been described by some as “flash mobs” and by others as youth uprisings.

The roundtable participants were:

Keturah Caesar.
Activist and organizer of the Philadelphia Coalition of the Heart and the Hip Hop Party for the People.

Tommy Joshua.
Organizer and executive director of Beats, Rhymes and Life: Hip-Hop Multimedia and Mentoring Program.

Diop Olugbala.
Philadelphia’s independent mayoral candidate for 2011.

Dr. Charles Williams.
Professor of education at Drexel University and director of the Center for the Prevention of School-Aged Violence.

Dessi.
An urban youth and a member of Beats, Rhymes and Life: Hip-Hop Multimedia and Mentoring Program.

Jaquel.
An urban youth and a member of Beats, Rhymes and Life: Hip-Hop Multimedia and Mentoring Program.

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